Final Gacaca report due in December

The National Service of Gacaca Jurisdictions is set to make public its overall final report since its inception in 2001. This was revealed by the Executive Secretary of the body, Domitille Mukantaganzwa, during an interview with The New Times. “The report will be launched in December this year and will contain the institution’s achievements, challenges and recommendations,” said Mukantaganzwa by telephone.
 genocide suspect appears before a Gacaca court. A report on the tribunals will be launched in December this year. The New Times File.
genocide suspect appears before a Gacaca court. A report on the tribunals will be launched in December this year. The New Times File.

The National Service of Gacaca Jurisdictions is set to make public its overall final report since its inception in 2001.

This was revealed by the Executive Secretary of the body, Domitille Mukantaganzwa, during an interview with The New Times.

“The report will be launched in December this year and will contain the institution’s achievements, challenges and recommendations,” said Mukantaganzwa by telephone.

Gacaca courts are semi traditional courts introduced to deal with the backlog of over a million cases involving persons suspected of committing the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

She stated that the courts will continue to operate until the drafting of the final report that is now under compilation.

Asked about the pending cases in the courts, Mukantaganzwa declined to comment, saying that she would call a press conference before the end of this week.

She mentioned that not all cases were handled by 31 July 2011, which was the official deadline for Gacaca to wrap up its activities, due to some unidentified challenges she declined to mention.

“We are going to have a press conference either on Friday this week or Monday next week where we shall give you all the details about the pending cases,” she emphasised.

Earlier this year, it was reported that the traditional courts had only 97 pending cases to be finalised by the end of July.

Some of the cases involved convicts who appealed, others that were not properly concluded and those of people convicted in absentia after they fled the country fearing to be tried via the courts.

Gacaca tried all cases except those involving key masterminds of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The instigators of the mass killings were mainly political and major opinion leaders who were instead referred to conventional courts. 

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