Local leaders call for ban of local brew

RUBAVU - Due to an increase in the brewing of illicit alcohol in Rubavu District as well as continued the smuggling of the substance from the Democratic Republic of Congo, authorities in the affected sectors are calling for a total ban of the brew.“Most of the locally made alcohol is mixed with marijuana and the practice is on the increase. We call for a ban on all locally made brews, whether legal or illegal, since all dealers are not genuine,” said the Executive Secretary of Rugerero Sector, Jean Sebikari Munyanganizi. 
Illegal brew being destroyed in a past event; Rubavu authorities have sounded concern over the growing use of such illicit liquor in the area. The New Times / File.
Illegal brew being destroyed in a past event; Rubavu authorities have sounded concern over the growing use of such illicit liquor in the area. The New Times / File.

RUBAVU - Due to an increase in the brewing of illicit alcohol in Rubavu District as well as continued the smuggling of the substance from the Democratic Republic of Congo, authorities in the affected sectors are calling for a total ban of the brew.

“Most of the locally made alcohol is mixed with marijuana and the practice is on the increase. We call for a ban on all locally made brews, whether legal or illegal, since all dealers are not genuine,” said the Executive Secretary of Rugerero Sector, Jean Sebikari Munyanganizi. 

He vowed to ban all illicit brews in his sector within three months and called on district authorities to join in the campaign to eradicate.

Smuggling of illegal brew as well as mixing it with opium became rampant in Rubavu after diseases wiped out banana plants in the farms – a key raw material in the making of legal brew.

“We are calling for the abolition of the substance because we doubt its hygiene and standards since it’s not tested. We shall only accept bottled alcohol,” added Sebikari.

Bernarda Kampire, one of 10 women netted, in a swoop, for dealing in the brews, told The New Times that she has been in the business for a long time to support her family.

“I import it from (DR) Congo or buy it from local brewers where one jerry can goes for Rwf3,000 and I make a profit of Rwf1,000 per jerry can,” explained Kampire.

She admitted the brew is illegal claimed not to know its consequences to the health of consumers.

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