Release of Genocide suspect controversial - Ngoga

Foreign media, yesterday reported that the Sweden's High Court had freed a Genocide suspect accused of taking part in the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi.  The Supreme Court in Sweden ruled that Sylvere Ahorugeze, 55, should be freed due to the length of his detention.
 Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga. The New Times File.
Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga. The New Times File.

Foreign media, yesterday reported that the Sweden's High Court had freed a Genocide suspect accused of taking part in the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi.

The Supreme Court in Sweden ruled that Sylvere Ahorugeze, 55, should be freed due to the length of his detention.

The Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga, told The New Times that the decision is contentious.

“I am yet to hear from prosecutors in Sweden but what we see through the press is that he was released because of the prolonged detention without trial,” Ngoga said.

Ahorugeze was arrested by Swedish police in 2008 in reaction to an Interpol arrest warrant over his role in the Genocide.

“Our position is very clear. We are not responsible for the delay and this fugitive is yet to face substantive trial. The decision just creates a controversy, a product of what these same developed jurisdictions often accuse us of,” Ngoga said.

“That a prolonged detention done by them takes precedence over charges of Genocide is just something we shall keep fighting against and in any event, we shall not tire before these fugitives roaming in European capitals get exhausted. They are the ones on the run, not us. We are exploring the next step.”

Ngoga also said that there was a decision to extradite Ahorugeze from Sweden which he appealed through the European Court of Human Rights.

Ralf Jartelius, a Swedish court official is quoted saying: "The Supreme Court decided yesterday that he has now been in detention for so long that it is not proper to keep him any longer."

Jartelius reportedly added that the court's written ruling will be released next week, and said that Ahorugeze has reportedly returned to his family in Denmark.

Ahorugeze was the Director General of the Civil Aviation Authority, during the Genocide. He alleged committed Genocide and crimes against humanity in Gikondo Nyenyeri.

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