Gov’t imports bulls to improve livestock quality

In a bid to improve the quality of livestock in the country, government recently purchased high-quality bulls and he-goats. The bulls will mainly provide semen for artificially insemination.According to Dr Christine Kanyandekwe, the deputy Director General for animal resources extension, the animals were bought from South Africa after being screened by staff from the Rwanda Agricultural Board (RAB).
 A cow in display during the last Agricultural Expo; Government has imported bulls as a way of enhancing the quality of animal husbandry (File Photo)
A cow in display during the last Agricultural Expo; Government has imported bulls as a way of enhancing the quality of animal husbandry (File Photo)

In a bid to improve the quality of livestock in the country, government recently purchased high-quality bulls and he-goats. The bulls will mainly provide semen for artificially insemination.

According to Dr Christine Kanyandekwe, the deputy Director General for animal resources extension, the animals were bought from South Africa after being screened by staff from the Rwanda Agricultural Board (RAB).

“We bought 10 bulls and 215 goats. Some bulls will be used to provide semen for artificial insemination to our cows in order to increase milk production in our country,” She said 

“These bulls are good breeds and semen will be distributed in different districts for the farmers to benefit.”

The breeds imported include,  Holstein, 3, Jersey 2, and Semmental 5.

Kanyandekwe noted that the Holstein and jersey bulls would be stationed at the Masaka Bull Station for semen collection. According to the officials, one bull can provide 600 doses of semen a week.

She added that others would be stationed at Kirehe, Gicumbi and Nyagatare districts for beef development projects.

Meanwhile, 15 boar goats purchased through an RAB project would be transferred to the Karama station while 200 Saanen goats are targeted for dairy purposes in Kirehe, Rwamagana and Kayonza districts.

The remaining goats would be distributed to families whose members are living with HIV/AIDS.

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