Wealth Declaration- leaders should lead by example

Over 180 civil servants are again in the spotlight. Reports from the office of the Ombudsman indicate that some civil servants are not complying with the 2006 Wealth Declaration law that requires them to submit their assets and liabilities for verification by June 30.The wealth declaration law which aims at fighting corruption through increased accountability and transparency is very clear to all leaders in government.

Over 180 civil servants are again in the spotlight. Reports from the office of the Ombudsman indicate that some civil servants are not complying with the 2006 Wealth Declaration law that requires them to submit their assets and liabilities for verification by June 30.

The wealth declaration law which aims at fighting corruption through increased accountability and transparency is very clear to all leaders in government.

This year, out of 7, 058 civil servants who were supposed to declare their wealth, 6, 975 did. The government has worked to entrench a culture of accountability and transparency and this has resulted in a largely corruption-free society.

Accountability and transparency can succeed only when those who violate the law are called to account. Public servants need to appreciate that they are required to be exemplary in the endeavor to promote the culture of accountability. By declaring their wealth on time, they are not only abiding by the law, but also espousing transparency and good governance.

While it’s commendable that the Ombudsman’s office has registered impressive improvements and, in the past, punished some government officials for a number of violations, the anti-corruption campaign should be sustained.

We cannot talk of the rule of law when some of those expected to be its custodians are the very people who violate it.

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