International course on GBV starts

A United Nations course on standardised training curriculum on investigation and prevention of sexual and gender-based crimes began, yesterday, at the Rwanda Peace Academy, Nyakinama, Musanze District.The two-week training of trainers program has attracted 17 police officers from Africa, America and Asia. It was organised by United Nations, Department of Peacekeeping Operation, UN Police Section.
 The three facilitators for the GBV course during the opening ceremony, yesterday. (Photo B Mukombozi)
The three facilitators for the GBV course during the opening ceremony, yesterday. (Photo B Mukombozi)

A United Nations course on standardised training curriculum on investigation and prevention of sexual and gender-based crimes began, yesterday, at the Rwanda Peace Academy, Nyakinama, Musanze District.

The two-week training of trainers program has attracted 17 police officers from Africa, America and Asia. It was organised by United Nations, Department of Peacekeeping Operation, UN Police Section.

Speaking at the official opening of the course, the Minister of Defence, James Kabarebe, called for international commitment to eradicate sexual and gender based crimes.

“Addressing sexual and gender based violence, requires a holistic and rigorous approach for change of society attitudes, appropriate legal and policy framework and strong mechanisms to ensure compliance,’’ Kabarebe said.

The training will be followed by a similar course for participants from French speaking countries, which will focus on the dynamics of sexual and GBV, UN resolutions, mass rape and genocide.

“Sexual and GBV should be looked at as a human security issue as well as a hindrance to sustainable development. It, therefore, requires involvement of stakeholders, decision makers, and genuine political will,’’ Kabarebe added.

Margaret Ng’ong’a Gulavic, from the UN, commended Rwanda for adopting community policing  policies that harness the voluntary assistance of local leaders to assist in implementing polices aimed at ending violence against women.

“Rwanda is recognised as setting a good example in policy and practice in the region that can be emulated. Its national institutions, particularly security organs have played an important role in creating an environment that fosters actions to aid women and child survivors of violence,’’  Gulavic said.

In 2008, the UN launched a campaign known as UNite to end violence against women and girls.

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