Phase 2 cervical cancer vaccination due next week

The second vaccination campaign against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is set to begin next week.The vaccine known as Gardasil is expected to reduce the number of women dying of cancer of the cervix.The cervix is the lower part of the womb which connects to the vagina.  It is also called the opening of the womb.
 A school girl receives her cervical cancer shot during the April campaign. The second vaccination phase starts next week (File Photo)
A school girl receives her cervical cancer shot during the April campaign. The second vaccination phase starts next week (File Photo)

The second vaccination campaign against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is set to begin next week.

The vaccine known as Gardasil is expected to reduce the number of women dying of cancer of the cervix.

The cervix is the lower part of the womb which connects to the vagina.  It is also called the opening of the womb. Cervical cancer occurs when cells on the cervix grow out of control.

It is a common cancer killer among women in Rwanda, with an incidence rate said to be at 49.4/100,000.

The World Health Organisation (WHO), estimates that about two women die each day from the disease in Rwanda.

Speaking to The New Times yesterday, Diane Mutamba, an official in the Ministry of Education said that the vaccine whose administering began in April is supposed to be offered in three phases.

“We will have remained with the third dose after the second one which begins on July 19 – 25,” Mutamba said.

She said that the campaign targets girls between the ages of 12 – 15.

“The vaccine will be administered to girls in Primary six at their respective schools, as was the case last time,” she said, but added that those out of school will get the vaccine from nearby health centres.

The first phase of the campaign targeted about 100, 000 girls and was recorded tremendous success.

97 percent of all school-going girls in the targeted age group received the vaccine while 45 percent of non-school going girls also benefited.

It is estimated that five percent of Rwandan girls in the targeted group do not go to school.

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