Most corruption cases are administrative - Ombudsman

Mal-administration and administrative corruption such as unfair dismissal of employees, discrimination and unfair promotions at work places are the highest forms of corruption registered, and stand at 82.37 percent, according to the 2009-2010 Ombudsman’s report.
U N delegates listen as the Ombudsman’s report is read (Photo T.Kisambira)
U N delegates listen as the Ombudsman’s report is read (Photo T.Kisambira)

Mal-administration and administrative corruption such as unfair dismissal of employees, discrimination and unfair promotions at work places are the highest forms of corruption registered, and stand at 82.37 percent, according to the 2009-2010 Ombudsman’s report.

Augustin Nzindukiyimana, the deputy Ombudsman in charge of Preventing and fighting Corruption yesterday presented the report to delegates from the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) and United Nations Office of Drug Crimes (UNODC).

The delegates are in the country to assess the implementation of the international anti-corruption instruments as requested by the convention.

The same report indicates that 53.24 percent corruption cases were recorded in the local administration while 43.19 percent was registered in the justice sector during the same period. In public procurement, 28.12 percent cases were registered.

Nzindukiyimana told the delegates that raising public awareness is one of the major strategies the Ombudsman’s Office uses to prevent and fight against corruption and injustice.

The UNCAC, the first legally binding international anti-corruption tool adopted by the UN General Assembly Resolution 58/4 of October 2003, obliges member states to implement a wide and detailed range of anti-corruption measures.

However, the UN anti corruption body is currently evaluating two of its four major tools in the fight against corruption including criminalisation and international cooperation. Other tools are prevention and asset recovery.

In a separate interview, Nzindukiyimana said that most of the tools were achieved in Rwanda.

“We did not achieve this to the maximum; there are some laws that need to be introduced,” he noted.

He outlined laws on international cooperation and investigating corruption as some of the acts that need to be introduced to further enhance the anti corruption campaign in the country.

“We cannot define the number of laws that should be introduced now, but after we get their (UNCAC) report, we will work on the required laws to be submitted to parliament for approval,” he added.

The delegates are also assessing the laws used in the anti corruption campaign.

Nzindukiyimana, however, said that the Ombudsman office still face challenges such as limited staff to accomplish its mission coupled with limited powers.

The efforts of the corruption watchdog’s body are complemented by a national anti-corruption advisory council composed of the Office of the Ombudsman, National Public Prosecution Authority (NPPA), Supreme Court, National Police and the Ministry of Justice among others.

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