UN to evaluate Rwanda’s anti-graft tools

A delegation from the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) is in the country to assess the implementation of the international anti-corruption instruments.  UNCAC, the first legally binding international anti-corruption tool, obliges its State Parties to implement a wide and detailed range of anti-corruption measures, affecting their laws, institutions and practices.
The delegation from the UN Convention Against Corruption visited the Gisozi Memorial centre, yesterday. (Photo T.Kisambira)
The delegation from the UN Convention Against Corruption visited the Gisozi Memorial centre, yesterday. (Photo T.Kisambira)

A delegation from the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) is in the country to assess the implementation of the international anti-corruption instruments.

UNCAC, the first legally binding international anti-corruption tool, obliges its State Parties to implement a wide and detailed range of anti-corruption measures, affecting their laws, institutions and practices.

The Director of the preventing and fighting corruption unit in the Ombudsman’s Office, Seraphin Ntagwabira Rumaziminsi, said that the delegates will assess how Rwanda implemented the convention.

“These measures aim to promote the prevention, criminalisation and law enforcement to fight corruption. They are assessing if the anti corruption laws used in Rwanda are compatible with the convention,” Rumaziminsi said.

Other UNCAC procedures include international cooperation to fight corruption, asset recovery, technical assistance and information exchange, and mechanisms for implementation.

Rumaziminsi explained that the delegates, who are on a five-day visit, will engage in direct dialogue with various government and private institutions engaged in the fight against corruption, including the national police, the National Public Prosecution Authority (NPPA) and the central bank.

“They want to see how they (Central Bank) are implementing the preventive measures of economic crimes through the financial system,” he added.

The will also hold talks with the Ministry of Justice, Transparency Rwanda, private sector and the media fraternity, among others.

“They have already assessed our documents but they are now looking at procedures used in clearing corruption culprits,” he noted.

The UNCAC was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 58/4 of October 2003 and signed by 140 countries.

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