Reflect on contribution to dev’t, Rwandan envoy to UK urges

LONDON - The Rwandan High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Ernest Rwamucyo, called on Rwandans to reflect on their individual and collective contribution to the development of Rwanda.He made the remarks as hundreds of Rwandans and friends of Rwanda living in the United Kingdom joined fellow Rwandans in celebrating the 17th anniversary of Liberation, at an event held in the British capital, London.
 Rwandans and friends of Rwanda were treated to cultural dance as they celebrated the 17th anniversary of the Liberation in London. (Courtesy Photo)
Rwandans and friends of Rwanda were treated to cultural dance as they celebrated the 17th anniversary of the Liberation in London. (Courtesy Photo)

LONDON - The Rwandan High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Ernest Rwamucyo, called on Rwandans to reflect on their individual and collective contribution to the development of Rwanda.

He made the remarks as hundreds of Rwandans and friends of Rwanda living in the United Kingdom joined fellow Rwandans in celebrating the 17th anniversary of Liberation, at an event held in the British capital, London.

The function, held at Westminster Abbey, saw participants take part in a church service to pray for Rwanda. After the service, a reception was held at Westminster Central Hall.

Rwamucyo challenged those present to reflect on the price paid by many - the ultimate sacrifice, life - to liberate Rwanda.

The High Commissioner reminded the guests of the significance of Rwanda’s Liberation Day, saying that this saw a rebirth of a new Rwanda after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

He added that the future for Rwanda is bright and all Rwandans must participate in nation building devoid of any ethnic sentiments.

Rwamucyo called upon Rwandans in the Diaspora to contribute to the development and prosperity of the country since they have access to opportunities and resources that many lack in Rwanda.

Westminster Abbey is steeped in more than a thousand years of history; Benedictine monks first came to the site in the middle of the tenth century, establishing a tradition of daily worship which continues to this day.

The Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066. The present church initiated by Henry III in 1245, is also the site where some of the most significant people in the nation's history are buried or commemorated.

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