Scottish students learn from Genocide survivors

KAMONYI – Scottish students have pledged to tell the story of Rwanda’s unity and reconciliation.The group of 15 students from Kilsyth Academy made the commitment on Thursday, while visiting an association of communities of Genocide survivors and perpetrators. They also donated two heifers to the association.
Scottish students pose for a photo with reconciled Genocide survivors and perpetrators.(Photo D.Sabiiti.J)
Scottish students pose for a photo with reconciled Genocide survivors and perpetrators.(Photo D.Sabiiti.J)

KAMONYI – Scottish students have pledged to tell the story of Rwanda’s unity and reconciliation.

The group of 15 students from Kilsyth Academy made the commitment on Thursday, while visiting an association of communities of Genocide survivors and perpetrators. They also donated two heifers to the association.

The students expressed astonishment at the stories of reconciliation between the survivors and perpetrators. Most members said they have managed to live together and support each other again after the dark era.

“The story of reconciliation in Rwanda is a lesson that we take back home and we shall tell the story so that others may learn from it,” one of the students, Callum Hall said.

Reverend Mark Fleming, the team’s chaplain, said Rwanda’s story is a sign of God’s power and an example to the world.

“The power of love in Rwanda is profound and Rwandans have made a right choice of seeking reconciliation in place of carrying on hatred,” Rev. Fleming said.

The group is in the country under the auspices of Comfort Rwanda and The Pilgrim Center for Healing and Reconciliation Ministries (PCHRM). The two have built 45 houses for the survivors and financed micro projects in their associations.

The students’ visit to Rwanda is aimed at learning lessons of reconciliation and how the country has transformed itself over the past 17 years, according to Pastor Paul Ndahigwa, the host.

The students also visited the homes, income generating projects of the association and shared various testimonies with the Genocide survivors and perpetrators. 

A survivor, Venacia Uwamahoro, whose husband has been convicted of Genocide, said the process of unity and reconciliation has been actualised through the association’s efforts.

“The association has enabled us to learn to choose to forgive. This is a personal commitment in seeking peace and harmony with others and helping each other in our needs.”

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