Belgian court’s move on Rusesabagina will help fight terrorism

Early this week, fugitive Paul Rusesabagina was questioned by the Belgian Federal Prosecution in the presence of in the presence of a rogatory investigative commission from Rwanda, on his links to the terrorist group, so-called Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR). The FDLR are remnants of the former Rwandan army (Ex-FAR) and Interahamwe militia responsible for the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. They consider Genocide in Rwanda an unfinished business and have continued to cause instability in the region.

Early this week, fugitive Paul Rusesabagina was questioned by the Belgian Federal Prosecution in the presence of in the presence of a rogatory investigative commission from Rwanda, on his links to the terrorist group, so-called Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR).

The FDLR are remnants of the former Rwandan army (Ex-FAR) and Interahamwe militia responsible for the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. They consider Genocide in Rwanda an unfinished business and have continued to cause instability in the region.

Interrogating Rusesabagina about his connection with FDLR could not have come at a better time. For long, the government of Rwanda has expressed concern over his continued financial support to the terrorists to perpetrate more violence in the region.

Rwanda has made it clear that whoever committs crimes of any nature should have their day in court.

There is need, therefore, for countries where Rusesabagina and his accomplices live, to give the evidence provided the seriousness it deserves. One of the biggest challenges in Africa is the culture of impunity whereby some individuals or groups commit or abet crimes and go unpunished.

While many countries have cooperated in arresting members of the FDLR, there is a lot more to be done. Fighting the terrorist group without cutting off its financial supply will not provide a lasting solution.

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