Officials concerned about rate of school dropout in the Northern Province

Musanze - There is a high rate of school dropouts especially in upper primary in the Northern Province, according to a survey conducted by education officials in the area. According to Johnson Ndayambaje, Regional Inspector of Education, in 2010-2011, the rate stood at 38 percent in P.5 and P. 6 in. While in P.1 and P.2, at least 29 percent dropped out of school in the same year.  
Education Minister Pierre Damien Habumuremyi
Education Minister Pierre Damien Habumuremyi

Musanze - There is a high rate of school dropouts especially in upper primary in the Northern Province, according to a survey conducted by education officials in the area.

According to Johnson Ndayambaje, Regional Inspector of Education, in 2010-2011, the rate stood at 38 percent in P.5 and P. 6 in. While in P.1 and P.2, at least 29 percent dropped out of school in the same year.  

He reported inadequate classrooms and toilets, untrained teachers and the lack of recreational facilities among the challenges facing nursery education.

Ndayambaje was yesterday speaking at a meeting of regional local officials and headteachers from schools in the Northern Province.

“Delivering lessons in English is a challenge to some teachers,” he added.

“Most teachers do not prepare their lessons. Headteachers rarely visit teachers in classrooms, and lack of qualified teachers in remote areas, especially at secondary level, remains a challenge.”  

Speaking at the same meeting, the Minister of Education, Pierre Damien Habumurenye, said head teachers should be held responsible for indiscipline among students.
The minister requested school authorities to embrace the national curriculum, national programs, and apply their skills to develop their localities.

“The student enrolment has increased tremendously. The directors should supervise how teachers prepare their lessons, how they deliver in class and monitor discipline among students. This is the core of education,” Habumuremye said.

The meeting set up a committee to explore solutions to the cited challenges.

The meeting observed that under the  Nine-Year Basic Education, more classrooms were constructed, student enrolment increased and science equipment was distributed.

Ends

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