Evidence of the Genocide must be preserved

The National Commission for the Fight Against Genocide (CNLG) in association with Aegis Trust, last week, launched an exhibition centre at the Murambi memorial site in the Southern Province.The exhibition comprises archived evidence of the 1994 Genocide against the Tusti, where more than a million people lost their lives.In Murambi alone, more than 45,000 people were killed at the site that had been constructed as a technical school.

The National Commission for the Fight Against Genocide (CNLG) in association with Aegis Trust, last week, launched an exhibition centre at the Murambi memorial site in the Southern Province.

The exhibition comprises archived evidence of the 1994 Genocide against the Tusti, where more than a million people lost their lives.

In Murambi alone, more than 45,000 people were killed at the site that had been constructed as a technical school.

In the aftermath of the Genocide, there have been numerous attempts by suspects, fugitives and a certain crop of politicians, across the world, to rewrite the events that happened during the Genocide.

The revisionists claim that what happened in Rwanda is not Genocide, yet, the evidence is there for all to see.

The denial of the Genocide is the final stage of the orchestrated plot to eliminate the Tutsi.

It is important, therefore, that the evidence is kept. Preserving the truth is an obligation for Rwanda and the World at large.

There are many in the World, today, who do not know the exact facts of the Genocide. Future generations will also want to know what happened in Rwanda.

To ensure that the history is not distorted, all evidence should be documented and archived at the various memorial sites across the country.

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