Response to Arthur Asiimwe’s article

Editor,LET me start by stating that I enjoy reading most of the articles published in your newspaper. I am also often in agreement with the analyses on different issues.However, I have to admit that I found myself on the opposing side of an argument advanced, on May 12, by one of your columnists, Arthur Asiimwe, under the title, “let’s discard this bad culture”.

Editor,

LET me start by stating that I enjoy reading most of the articles published in your newspaper. I am also often in agreement with the analyses on different issues.
 
However, I have to admit that I found myself on the opposing side of an argument advanced, on May 12, by one of your columnists, Arthur Asiimwe, under the title, “let’s discard this bad culture”.

We should celebrate the fact that Rwandans are politically engaged enough to care about what’s going on in their government, and that’s encouraging, rather than discouraging.

Secondly, there shouldn’t be such a thing as leaving political matters to experts and political scientists alone. It’s not only dangerous but we also know how many times the so-called political experts/pundits have been wrong in their own area of ‘expertise’.

I agree that we shouldn’t always read mischief in any cabinet reshuffle because it’s not always the case, but at the same time, we know that ministers are, sometimes, dropped because of poor performance, promoted for their hard work, or even dropped in favour of new blood.
There is nothing wrong with discussing that because it happens in governments all over the world.
 
Rather, what we, Rwandans, need to agree on is to discourage the culture of entitlement and having people believing that they own the positions they occupy.

We should be proud as Rwandans that we still have interest in how our country is governed, and our interest in politics is very much a part of our history, and I do believe it’s engrained in our DNA.

To suggest that the discussion about cabinet reshuffles should be left to experts alone is condescending to the ordinary Rwandans.

I urge journalists and other experts to desist from telling Rwandans what’s good or bad for them, because most of them are mature and intelligent enough to know, and besides, dictating to people what to do, would be applying double standards.

It is true that some negative elements out there will always read mischief in anything our government does and will try to spin it to their advantage, but I am also equally worried that a stance like Asiimwe’s would paint an unfounded belief that the Rwandan government suppresses free expression.

Finally, Asiimwe’s line of argument is rather interesting because it could be applied in other areas other than politics.

Does he suggest that matters of economy should be left to economists and not Rwandans since they lack the expertise?

Or does he mean that citizens have no business engaging in matters of governance? I believe this would be a dangerous trend to follow.

Blessings,
Claude T. Ngarambe
claudetalent@yahoo.ca

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