What they said

Several students willingly shared their views, the purpose for the walk, the significance of laying wreaths, the purpose of the memorial site and the message they had for Rwanda’s youth and the whole country. “The walk was important to him because commemoration in itself should be a priority for all of us.”—Mucyo Daniel, S.6.
L-R : Mucyo Daniel ; Nadia Karemera ; Andrew and Josiane ; Innocent Karake and Caroline Umukobwa ; Linda Katangulia, Joel Semukanya and Daniel Rusa.
L-R : Mucyo Daniel ; Nadia Karemera ; Andrew and Josiane ; Innocent Karake and Caroline Umukobwa ; Linda Katangulia, Joel Semukanya and Daniel Rusa.

Several students willingly shared their views, the purpose for the walk, the significance of laying wreaths, the purpose of the memorial site and the message they had for Rwanda’s youth and the whole country.

“The walk was important to him because commemoration in itself should be a priority for all of us.”—Mucyo Daniel, S.6.

“Laying the wreaths was something important because it re-affirmed the reason to honor the victims as they deserve and the memorial site is a place to give us knowledge and understanding enough to help us build Rwanda into something better than before.”—Nadia Karemera, S.6.

“It was important for youth to be present to represent their school and support their fellow youth. We learnt that Rwanda was traditionally based on togetherness and what happened during the Genocide was betrayal of that virtue.” –Andrew and Josiane, students from Green Hills Academy who attended the walk.

“We believe the site is a major tool of elimination of the Genocide ideology because it reveals its causes to help us avoid it.”— Innocent Karake, S.6 and Caroline Umukobwa, S.5.

“We came out with courage to dare to change our past through unity for a better Rwanda and do our best to support the survivors.”—Linda Katangulia, Joel Semukanya and Daniel Rusa.

Ends