Fuel issue a reality to deal with

Editor, As an economist, I believe the increase in fuel prices is one of those realities we have to deal with during these times when the oil producing parts of the world seem to be experiencing turmoil.
Former street children at the Youth Rehabilitation and Vocational Skills Development Centre, Iwawa Island, learning how to build (Photo D. Umutesi)
Former street children at the Youth Rehabilitation and Vocational Skills Development Centre, Iwawa Island, learning how to build (Photo D. Umutesi)

Editor,

As an economist, I believe the increase in fuel prices is one of those realities we have to deal with during these times when the oil producing parts of the world seem to be experiencing turmoil.

On the other hand, I would say Rwanda has relatively dealt with the situation despite being a landlocked country as the situation in neighbouring countries with sea ports, goes out of hand.

In my opinion, all this goes back to the way the government monitors and manages the economy to ensure that even when prices go up, at least a level of sanity is maintained to benefit both consumers and suppliers.

While we are also feeling the pinch here in Rwanda, we are much better off than neighbouring countries, thanks to the efforts of the leadership to shield consumers from the after-effects of the sharp price increase.

In the meantime, it is up to us all to understand the times we are in and the reality that fuel prices could continue to skyrocket as long as the conflicts around the Middle East continue.

When oil prices go up, food and transport costs also go up. It is not rocket science to figure out that prices of every commodity rotate around fuel prices. Let’s pray for calm and peace to return around the world.

Gaspard Munyanshoza
Kigali

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