MPs push for speedy enforcement of court verdicts

MUHANGA – The Parliamentary Committee on National Unity, Human Rights and the Fight against Genocide Ideology, has urged officials in Muhanga District to ensure enforcement of court verdicts.
A suspect appears before a Gacaca session. MPs have said that Gacaca sentences were not enforced
A suspect appears before a Gacaca session. MPs have said that Gacaca sentences were not enforced

MUHANGA – The Parliamentary Committee on National Unity, Human Rights and the Fight against Genocide Ideology, has urged officials in Muhanga District to ensure enforcement of court verdicts.

Evariste Kalisa, the committee’s chairperson, said that findings from a countrywide tour by MPs, indicate that enforcement of court decisions, including Gacaca court verdicts, was too slow.

“There are still many unresolved judicial cases, including those related to Gacaca, in many districts. Leaders need to coordinate this exercise to make sure that justice is served,” he noted.

The Mayor of Muhanga District, Yvonne Mutakwasuku, attributed the delays to capacity challenges at the grassroots, especially among the cell Executive Secretaries, who are the principal enforcers.

She suggested that the responsibility be given to local leaders with higher educational backgrounds.
The parliamentary delegation also called for the respect of human rights in the district.

“We need to develop a culture of respect for human rights. We must also work hand-in-hand in the fight against genocide ideology, protection of children and improvement of the justice sector in general.”

The lawmakers also urged the district to address issues of family and child welfare and to complete houses for vulnerable Genocide survivors. About 329 out of the 395 houses needed are under construction.

They also requested the district administration to encourage residents to fully participate in the forthcoming 17th Genocide commemoration.

The legislators were in Muhanga to discuss with the district leaders a wide range of issues, most of which featured prominently in the 2010 report by the National Human Rights Commission.

Ends

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment