The other side of revolution

For the past three months we have had blockbuster entertainment, revolution after revolution, political earthquakes, social tsunamis and change in real time. This has not been an accident, it has been planned and orchestrated by people, and some of these have been journalists.

For the past three months we have had blockbuster entertainment, revolution after revolution, political earthquakes, social tsunamis and change in real time. This has not been an accident, it has been planned and orchestrated by people, and some of these have been journalists.

Al-Jazeera has been instrumental in this and some say it is a main instigator of the revolutions. As events concluded in Egypt , they promised a new even bigger blockbuster – Libya , but this event has proved bloody and protracted and can be called a civil war.

Parts of the TV media, most of it in fact seemed to condone civil unrest in the name of good television. As I was watching these giants being toppled by mobs of righteous fury, I was forgetting the consequences of this charade.

Now my transport costs have gone up with oil hitting $115 a barrel when there is no extra demand, just fear that supply could dwindle. Arab investment in sub-Saharan Africa is on hold, Rwandatel is in limbo with its Libyan part-owners embroiled in more serious matters. The Gulf states which are a source of imported consumer goods are raising their prices.

Soon the world might see why the West just wanted stability above all else because conflicts cost money. The post-revolution hangover always leads to the same realisation – a revolution is the start and not the end.

They have found that Ali Baba is gone but his forty thieves are still there, that the system is flawed but you cannot have a vacuum. Then the worst realisation, only slow change is truly lasting and effective. In geometry, a revolution takes you back to where you were before, same as politics.

The Bible asks you to pray for your leaders, because their spirit flows over a nation, maybe the opposite is true. A leader is the reflection of a nation’s character at the time, that is why you have a Mubarak in Egypt and not in Norway.

It is common when I go to visit regional countries to hear locals say “lend us your president for a year, then we will really develop.

” Said a man to me in Kenya , he was urinating on the street at the time, I said they would revolt after 10 minutes, firstly you would be arrested for urinating on the street. He said it was his right to urinate, it was his country and it is a democracy.

Again, national character, many top Rwandans tried to fit in other countries but found the national character impossible to integrate into.

Ugandans during campaigns took bribes while complaining about corruption “when will our leaders change?” the simple answer is when the people change their character and aspirations. Until then false prophets will prey on your fears and your hopes will die. The real revolution is in the hearts of people, not in Tahrir square.     

ramaisibo@hotmail.com

 

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