Peat energy introduced in prisons

KIGALI - The National Prisons Service (NPS) has introduced the use of peat energy in prisons across the country as an alternative to firewood which is not only costly, but also destructive to the environment. Peat is vegetation matter that is carbonised to be used as either fertilizer or source of energy after decomposition.
(R-L) Mary Gahonzire, the Commissioner General of Prisons, Eng. Coletha Ruhamya, the  State Minister for Water and Energy, and Mussa Fazil Hererimana, the Minister of Internal Security, during the tour of Remera Prison, yesterday.
(R-L) Mary Gahonzire, the Commissioner General of Prisons, Eng. Coletha Ruhamya, the State Minister for Water and Energy, and Mussa Fazil Hererimana, the Minister of Internal Security, during the tour of Remera Prison, yesterday.

KIGALI - The National Prisons Service (NPS) has introduced the use of peat energy in prisons across the country as an alternative to firewood which is not only costly, but also destructive to the environment.

Peat is vegetation matter that is carbonised to be used as either fertilizer or source of energy after decomposition.

During the inauguration of peat use at Remera Prison in Kimironko, yesterday, the Commissioner General of NPS, Mary Gahonzire, said that the government has saved over Rwf 18m, in the last three months that they have used the peat energy at the Kimironko prison only.
The Kimironko facility is home to 5,150 inmates.

Gahonzire said that this form of energy will be introduced in all the 10 prisons in the country, saving the Government over Rwf720m a year. Over 60 tonnes of peat are extracted every day.

According to Gahonzire, 1 kg of peat costs Rwf40 and burns for two days while charcoal costs Rwf150 a kilo and only lasts minutes.

Speaking at the event, the State Minister in charge Energy and Water, Eng. Coletha Ruhamya, hailed the Prison services for being the first institution to use peat as a source of energy.
“The government will seek to use this energy source in all institutions that have been using firewood,” Ruhamya said.

Addressing the over 5,000 inmates, Musa Fazil Harerimana, the Minister of Internal Security, hailed the prisons service for their innovativeness, which he attributed to the prevailing good governance in the country.

Currently peat is mined in three swamps in the Eastern, Western and Northern provinces which have been provided by Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA).

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