Civil servants’ retention very critical

The civil service has, traditionally, been regarded as a gateway to better paying jobs in the private sector and international organisations. Others have looked at it as an opportunity to gain access to further studies with numerous scholarships available to the civil servants, which in itself is not a bad thing, as capacity building is paramount on our development agenda.

The civil service has, traditionally, been regarded as a gateway to better paying jobs in the private sector and international organisations.

Others have looked at it as an opportunity to gain access to further studies with numerous scholarships available to the civil servants, which in itself is not a bad thing, as capacity building is paramount on our development agenda. However, upon completion, the graduates shun the public service for perceived greener pastures.

In the worst case scenario, others decide not to come back to serve the country that used hard-earned taxpayers’ money to pay for their tuition and upkeep in the countries where they undertake their studies.

This has all been attributed to the pay in the public service that they claim cannot meet their preferred standards of living.

It is, therefore, imperative, as promised by the Minister of Public Service, that a study will come up with a well packaged retention policy on public servants.

And, the focus should be beyond remuneration. The study should endeavour to identify ways to make the public sector more attractive. The employees should feel part and parcel of the various government programmes aimed at supporting the country’s transition into a medium income economy.

It is, however, equally important to note that this should be a two-way thing, the public servants should reciprocate by giving their best to the betterment of their country.  

Ends

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