Increased TIG service will spur development

The Minister of Justice announced, on Tuesday, that the Work for General Interest programme, commonly known as TIG, would apply to convicts of all crimes, a move that will inevitably spur development.

The Minister of Justice announced, on Tuesday, that the Work for General Interest programme, commonly known as TIG, would apply to convicts of all crimes, a move that will inevitably spur development.

Once operational, the law, that is currently before the senate, will ensure that TIG which was only applicable to convicts of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, applies to other felonies.

Considering what has been achieved by this service; construction of public infrastructure as well as houses for vulnerable survivors of the Genocide - works worth billions of Rwandan francs, an increased number of participants will, not only contribute to more public works, but will save the Government funds that would have, otherwise, been used to pay for labour.

Additionally, this development will further boost the reforms that are underway in the national prisons services, particularly the transition to a correctional system from the punitive form that is currently in place.

With more prisoners getting access to life outside the detention facilities, public perceptions towards them will be more understanding, hence easing their reintegration within their respective societies upon completion of their sentences.

It is, however, important that as the expansion is implemented, the process is closely monitored to forestall corruption. There have been reports of the TIG service being used to work on privately owned projects, which if true, would constitute blatant abuse. 

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