Police undergo criminal investigation training

KIGALI - Twenty-seven police officers, yesterday, completed a six-week training course in intelligence and investigation. The officers, including three Burundians, were equipped with skills in criminal analysis, intelligence and community policing.
Remy L-R Sinkazi,the Ambassodor of Burundi to Rwanda, Stanley Nsabimana Deputy CGP and the British envoy, Nicholas Canon yesterday (Photo T.Kisambira)
Remy L-R Sinkazi,the Ambassodor of Burundi to Rwanda, Stanley Nsabimana Deputy CGP and the British envoy, Nicholas Canon yesterday (Photo T.Kisambira)

KIGALI - Twenty-seven police officers, yesterday, completed a six-week training course in intelligence and investigation.

The officers, including three Burundians, were equipped with skills in criminal analysis, intelligence and community policing.

The course was conducted by officials from London Metropolitan University as part of the partnership between the British High Commission in Rwanda and the Rwanda National Police (RNP).

An event to officially close the training was held at the force’s headquarters in Kacyiru, and presided over by the Deputy Commissioner General of Police, Stanley Nsabimana.
Nsabimana appealed to the officers to use the acquired skills to enhance the force’s performance.

Skillful detection and prevention of crimes, establishing intelligence networks and effectively dealling with emerging threats, are some of the areas Nsabimana urged the officers to boost.

He urged them to develop crime analysis cells, maintain discipline and pass over the acquired knowledge to their fellow officers.

Nsabimana commended the existing relationship between the UK and Rwanda, “especially in training which is fundamental for RNP’s profession, values and ethos.”

“This course in particular comes at the right time when the world and our region in particular is threatened with trans-national organized crimes like terrorism, piracy, cyber crimes, drug and human trafficking and money laundering, which have created a shift from the traditional way of responding to crimes, to a modern philosophy of policing known as intelligence-led policing,” Nsabimana noted.

He commended Burundi for the partnership in both training and operations against cross-border crimes.

The British High Commissioner to Rwanda, Nicholas Cannon, said that the training is a tribute to the force’s professionalism and being exemplary, and promised further training of this nature.

Burundi’s Ambassador to Rwanda, Remy Sinkazi, thanked both Rwanda and UK for allowing them to have their forces take part in the training.

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