What next for Tetteh?

HE is the only African coach to win a World Cup. But as Sellas Tetteh will testify, this is his most difficult job in a career that spans over 30 years. The Ghanaian signed a three-year-deal early this year where he was mandated among other things to steer the national side (Amavubi Stars) to the 2012 Africa Nations Cup in Guinea Bissau and Gabon.
Tetteh finds himself in a very difficult position after seeing his wasps lose their opening two 2012 CAN qualifiers (Photo. E. Niyonshuti)
Tetteh finds himself in a very difficult position after seeing his wasps lose their opening two 2012 CAN qualifiers (Photo. E. Niyonshuti)

HE is the only African coach to win a World Cup. But as Sellas Tetteh will testify, this is his most difficult job in a career that spans over 30 years.

The Ghanaian signed a three-year-deal early this year where he was mandated among other things to steer the national side (Amavubi Stars) to the 2012 Africa Nations Cup in Guinea Bissau and Gabon.

But with stout opposition in African giants Ivory Coast and Benin, it was always going to be a tall order for Tetteh given the fact that he is trying to build a new team.
I have had several one on one dialogues with the man and believe me, I have been left in awe with his charisma, passion, humility and persona.

The Ghanaian does not start or end a press conference or training session without saying a prayer.
Since his arrival, one of the many doldrums he keeps bringing up is Amavubi’s over reliance on foreign (naturalized) players and lack of a competitive league.

The way forward according to the 52-yer-old is to groom and nurture young, talented local players and where possible, ‘export’ them to foreign clubs.

Without pointing fingers, many players have missed out on juicy professional deals just because their local clubs are too selfish to let them go. (Will elaborate more next time)
After Saturday’s 3-0 battering by Benin, every body seemed to be disgusted with Amavubi, their appalling defence and improvidence infront of goal.

However, the sport’s stakeholders (administrators and players) still have hope that Tetteh could rewrite more history by guiding the wasps to their second Africa Nations Cup.

I approached Tetteh for a post match comment last Saturday and his facial expression said it all.
Not only was he reluctant to talk to the press, he also looked a very dejected man - all the hard work he had put in over the past three weeks had gone unnoticed.

Usually, it is next to impossible for any Amavubi coach to rally local sports journalists after such a heavy home defeat (3-0) but on Saturday, there was a change of heart. It was a moment that almost welled up my small eyes.

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