German actress and filmmaker Annemarie Prins in the country

A German popular theater actress/filmmaker Annemarie Prins is in the country for the preparations of ‘Breaking The Silence’ to be screened in April 2011, during the 17th genocide commemoration.
Annemarie Prins during the interview. (Photo by T. Tasamba).
Annemarie Prins during the interview. (Photo by T. Tasamba).

A German popular theater actress/filmmaker Annemarie Prins is in the country for the preparations of ‘Breaking The Silence’ to be screened in April 2011, during the 17th genocide commemoration.

‘Breaking The Silence’ is a Cambodian play about regaining dreams and hope, betrayals, guilt and the stories of people who survived genocide are told in a series of vignettes.
The play was directed by Prins and since its premiere in February 2009, it has been screened in many parts of Cambodia.

The 78-year-old active theater veteran Prins went to Cambodia six years ago where she worked with a few Cambodians on a play about how survivours deal with the effects of genocide.
“The play portrays the everyday life and actuality in Cambodia,” Prins said.

“Within the families and communities there is still the feeling of trauma, where people don’t dare tell their stories.”

She added that the play features traditional Cambodian music and dances to help people get the message more easily.

After watching ‘Breaking The Silence’, George Weiss, the director and founder of Radio La Benevolencija (RLB) was convinced that with a few modifications, the play would be made relevant to Rwanda.

“The aim of bringing Breaking The Silence to Rwanda is to promote the culture of sisterhood and brotherhood between the two countries, since they both experienced genocide,” Weiss told The New Times.

Weiss said he believes it is important for genocide survivors in Cambodia and Rwanda to know that they are not alone, because there are other people in the world who share their agony.

“Rwanda has many lessons to teach the world, for example, promoting peace, unity, reconciliation between genocide survivours and the perpetrators, as well as Gacaca after the genocide,” he said.

While in the country, the guests visited various places including, Ishyo Arts Centre, University centre for arts and drama, Murambi and Gisozi memorial sites and attended a workshop at Musekeweya.

Prins and Nan van Houte, a Dutch theatre institute director, arrived in the country last week and are expected to depart on Sept 23.

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