Yes, Rwanda can replicate Korea’s success

Some words of our increasing number of eminent visitors need to be re-echoed for our own edification as well as reminder. Visiting Korean Professor Won Gyu Hwang uttered some very important words which we need to take to heart in regard to Rwanda’s economic development. First establishing Korea’s similarities with Rwanda,  Professor Hwang described the former Korean income as having ever been the poorest economy in East Asia, and described this come-around as as hand to brain.

Some words of our increasing number of eminent visitors need to be re-echoed for our own edification as well as reminder. Visiting Korean Professor Won Gyu Hwang uttered some very important words which we need to take to heart in regard to Rwanda’s economic development. First establishing Korea’s similarities with Rwanda,  Professor Hwang described the former Korean income as having ever been the poorest economy in East Asia, and described this come-around as as hand to brain.

Hard work and creativity were key factors to creating wealth. The excellent example he gave was how Korea has earned a fortune through human hair.

With a bigger advantage over other neighbouring countries in having stable leadership, we need to bring to pass economic development that will come with so much less encumbrances that the bigger nations around us have and are groaning under. We need to utilise every single penny that goes into our coffers, without it getting diverted into other non-planned for activities, however developmental. We need to keep sight of every objective we make.

Rwanda can improve on the export structure and invest in the lower community, by emphasising the likes of Agaseke, fruit drinks, as well as the most current brain wave – investing in, instead of bewailing – our abundant rocky terrain.

These are some few aspects whose industries can be expanded and specifically designed for export.

Indeed, let Rwanda use its brains, instead of macho that has been the ruin of neighbouring economies, to develop its citizens. The cooperatives programme needs to be energised more so that bigger groups of people access government financing and professional advice.

This is now quite possible because of the increasing decentralisation process that is seeing more power going to the lower levels of local administration.
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