EAC Governance conference opens in Nairobi

THE 2nd annual EAC Conference on Good Governance kicked-off in Nairobi yesterday with participants calling for effective institutions to support the principles of good governance.
The EAC Deputy Secretary General (Political Federation) Beatrice Kiraso addresses participants at the 2nd EAC Good Governance conference yesterday  at  Hilton Hotel Nairobi Kenya. (Photo / Mukhtar Abdul - EAC)
The EAC Deputy Secretary General (Political Federation) Beatrice Kiraso addresses participants at the 2nd EAC Good Governance conference yesterday at Hilton Hotel Nairobi Kenya. (Photo / Mukhtar Abdul - EAC)

THE 2nd annual EAC Conference on Good Governance kicked-off in Nairobi yesterday with participants calling for effective institutions to support the principles of good governance.

The three-day meeting is being held under the theme; “Good Governance for Sustainable Integration, Stability and Development.”

In his opening remarks, Kenya’s Justice Minister, Mutula Kilonzo, emphasized that good governance must form the basis of all state and public actions, decisions and policies.

Kilonzo particularly commended the manner in which elections were held in Rwanda and in his own country, adding that “National elections in these states have been greeted with global approval.”

Kenya earlier this month held a referendum on the proposed new constitution.

EAC Deputy Secretary General (Political Federation), Beatrice Kiraso, said that economic principles of good governance require policies that promote broad-based growth, and a dynamic private sector which she said, would ultimately lead to poverty reduction in the region.

“Of high priority in the economic principle is the need to invest in people through policies that improve access to quality education, health and other services that underpin the human resource,” Kiraso told the over 100 participants gathered at the Hilton hotel.

Paul Ngarua, an official of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) said that good governance in the region is still hindered by the lack of constitutions that are people-driven.

“When people give themselves constitutions, they must also give themselves necessary institutions to make sure that judicial services delivered are of quality to the people of East Africa,” he said.

For good governance to take root in the region, participants noted that there is need for citizens as well as members of civil society organizations to participate in the democratic process.

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