Bribery on the decrease – report

Incidences of bribery decreased slightly from 24.4 per cent last year to 23.9 per cent this year, Rwanda Bribery Index 2017 report shows. At least 2,385 respondents took part in the survey.

Incidences of bribery decreased slightly from 24.4 per cent last year to 23.9 per cent this year, Rwanda Bribery Index 2017 report shows. At least 2,385 respondents took part in the survey.

The report, which was released on Tuesday in Kigali, said the percentage of people who directly or indirectly demanded for or offered bribe decreased mainly due to strict punitive measures in institutions such as Rwanda National Police.

It however highlights that bribery remains a challenge to deal with in traffic police, electricity services, University and Civil society.

Police operations conducted last week along major highways across the country nabbed 30 drivers who attempted to bribe traffic police officers.

The report said there is need to increase preventive measures against the individuals who are still abusing their position for private gain.

The bribery incident was recorded at 9.19 per cent in electricity from 2.2 per cent last year, according to the report.

However, the likelihood in the private sector significantly reduced from 17.3 per cent last year to 9 per cent this year.

Others are university with 8.22 per cent, civil society asked for bribes at a rate of 5.7 per cent this year from 3.7 per cent last year while 5.5 per cent of Rwanda Revenue Authority officials seeking bribes decreased to 3.86 per cent.

Banks and medical services are the least to ask for bribes this year.

Commenting on the report, Appolinaire Mupinganyi, the Executive Director of Transparency International Rwanda, hailed institutions for the slight decrease and added it was thanks to punitive measures taken by concerned institutions.

“There is an improvement in general and the trend is decreasing though it is a slight one,” he said.

“Traffic police has also seen significant improvement in prevalence of bribes mainly due to tough punitive measures against the corrupt individuals who try to bribe traffic police,” he added.

 “There is need for more campaigns and media should help in promoting investigative journalism to minimise the loopholes, there is also need to embrace ICT and reduce physical interactions as it influences corruption,” Mupiganyi noted.

According to the report, 85.9 per cent of Rwandans think the government’s efforts in the fight against corruption are effective, which is almost the same perception as in 2016 where it was at 85.5 per cent.

Clement Musangabatware, Deputy Ombudsman in charge of Preventing and Fighting Corruption and related offences called for more efforts to stem it as it is one of the major obstacles to structural transformation, aggravates inequality and injustice and undermines stability.

“Corruption undermines democratic institutions, slows economic development and contributes to governmental instability. Corruption attacks the foundation of democratic institutions by perverting the rule of law among others,” he said.

He said that Rwanda has committed to fight corruption is all forms, created institutions and committed to working with partners to end the trend.

Rwanda still remains the least corrupt country within the East African region and third in Africa according to Corruption Perception Index of 2016 published by Transparency International.

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