Editorial: Traders should exploit the business side of presidential campaigns

The presidential campaigns kicked off last week as the three candidates embarked on the grueling journey of traversing the country to solicit for votes.

The presidential campaigns kicked off last week as the three candidates embarked on the grueling journey of traversing the country to solicit for votes.

The campaign period comes with excitement for supporters as they eagerly wait to hear from their candidates.

 

This has been manifested in the massive turn-up of people at some rallies particularly the ones of the RPF-Inkotanyi presidential candidate Paul Kagame.

 

However, away from the politics, the campaign period presents a good opportunity for innovative traders to make money.

 

Indeed, some smart traders have taken advantage of the opportunity and are already reaping big from selling products like T-shirts, caps, key holders, car stickers and scarves, among other products, to supporters of the different political parties and candidates in the race.

Around Kigali city and its suburbs, many people are buying items, as a sign of solidarity with and support for their respective candidates and party.  During this period, many supporters want to have something in their possession that relates to their party or presidential candidate.

Indeed, the small traders selling these products are doing well as the demand for these items is high. For example although a T-shirt bearing the portrait of one of the presidential aspirants goes for about Rwf13,500, many people from all walks of life are buying en mass.  

What makes the whole initiative unique is that the items are made locally.

For the traders who seized the opportunity, it should become a culture to do the same during all the big events in the country; and for those traders yet to join the ‘party’ it is not late. They still have a chance to make money in the remaining days.

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