FARG grapples with fraudulent beneficiaries

Seventeen years since the Genocide Survivors Assistance Fund (FARG) was formed, the organisation is still dealing with beneficiaries who end up on the list under false pretences.

Seventeen years since the Genocide Survivors Assistance Fund (FARG) was formed, the organisation is still dealing with beneficiaries who end up on the list under false pretences.

Addressing the parliamentary Committee on Human Rights and Fight against Genocide, last week, Naphtal Ahishakiye, the executive secretary of Ibuka, said the umbrella survivors’ organisation continues to face a challenge of people whose stories are distorted for selfish interests.

 

“We still have to deal with people who are on the list yet they do not deserve to be. This is not made any simple by local leaders who connive with locals to benefit themselves and their loved ones,” he said.

 

The Government earmarks 6 per cent of its annual revenues to support the Fund.

 

In 2011, FARG dropped 19,514 students, 30.7 per cent of the total beneficiaries, after they were found to be ineligible for the support. This saved the Government over Rwf8 billion.

FARG Programmes Director Daphy Mukakigeri said the law that establishes the organisation stipulates that support only go to those who survived the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

“We rely on local authorities to verify who a survivor is and our job is to enter the authentic ones and give them the support that they deserve,” she said.

Jean Ruzindana, who represented the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide, said it is important for those seeking support to fulfill the requirements.

“There is a budget but where necessary, we have approached schools and sought support for survivors and we have been supported by several schools in the past. We cannot drop anyone unless it has been proven beyond reasonable doubt that they are a fraud,” he said.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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