EDITORIAL: No, Rwanda Day shouldn’t be turned into a courtroom

As was expected, this year’s edition of the now popular Rwanda Day held in Gent, Belgium, did not disappoint. It did not receive advance mediatisation as the previous ones, but the fact that about 3000 people turned out at short notice is an indication that the event holds an important place in many people’s hearts.

As was expected, this year’s edition of the now popular Rwanda Day held in Gent, Belgium, did not disappoint.

It did not receive advance mediatisation as the previous ones, but the fact that about 3000 people turned out at short notice is an indication that the event holds an important place in many people’s hearts.

 

And all who attend come from every corner of the world, not just the host city. It is a time to interact with their President, senior government officials and long-lost acquaintances. It is a very big nostalgic party.

 

But apart from the fun side and excitement that Rwanda Day always seems to stir, a dark blot also always comes up. The President is always confronted with problems that could have been solved earlier by lower administrative levels.

 

Why does it take the President to travel thousands of miles to solve injustices?

How does someone whose case is known by nearly all administrative levels wait for two decades to get an answer, apart from; “be patient”? really?

Some people seeking justice have to follow the President’s trail with the hope that they might be able to capture his attention in order to seek justice. Why go to that extent when the answer is either in Kigali or our diplomatic missions?

Should Rwanda Day be a platform to name and shame public officials who fail to do their duties? A place where to file petitions? No, that will only defeat its main purpose; interacting with one another and rekindling the patriotic spirit.

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