Talk to your teacher openly over the matter

Every child deserves love and security in the hands of their teachers and parents. Teacher-parental home conflicts are two separate entities that need to be differentiated on professional grounds.

Every child deserves love and security in the hands of their teachers and parents. Teacher-parental home conflicts are two separate entities that need to be differentiated on professional grounds.  Being frustrated and nicknamed by your teacher due to neighborhood conflicts with your parents at home is a serious sign that the revulsion has grown reaching dangerously high levels with less respect and belief in the professionalism of the teacher. When parents and teachers have background clashes which remain unresolved, the family becomes a weaker alliance between home and school and lower parent involvement in school, both of which may negatively impact the child’s school adjustment.

Something needs to be done to find a “win-win” negotiation strategy through logical mediation skills and violence prevention approach between your teacher and your parents to prevent their conflict from interfering with your studies. Most teachers have received very little training in fostering parent-teacher relationships and are good at plunking transferred anger to a child.  Try to approach your teacher during his happy moods and expressly demonstrate your level of innocence in the conflict and your determination to foster a positive relationship with him. You could also suggest to him about your effort in arranging a meeting with your parents so they would talk directly to each other and strike a consensus. Feel free to explain to your teacher that parents can’t control what happens in class and that the classroom is the domain of the teacher with whom you need to enjoy a close and supportive relationship so as to be more engaged, work harder and improve your performance. Your approach may work as an eye-opener for the teacher to discover your positive attitude towards him and be able to separate you from the conflict.

 

Similarly, sit down with your parents at home and discuss the importance of establishing a positive relationship with your teachers. Tell them that when teachers and parents are allies and are willing to put aside those home-neighborhood differences and be teammates, their combined efforts will fix a positive teacher-student relationship and ultimately boost your academic performance. They should be reminded that differences in values can be bridged only by holding open communication, respect and willingness to compromise.

 

If this doesn’t work out, then go with your parents to the principal of the school and voice your concerns to have this teacher warned or transferred. If the school doesn’t act and the teacher continues to mistreat you, then you and your parents should follow the chain of command up to the sector Education officer and if the problem remains unresolved, consider legal action with an education lawyer. Provide documentation of steps you’ve taken to rectify the problem, as well as the responses you’ve received at all levels. Keep copies of all correspondence electronic and written. The reason is that a single complaint against a teacher is not taken as seriously as multiple complaints. It’s harder to deny a problem when so many people know about it. If the worst come to the worst, consider asking your parents to switch you to another school.

 

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