AU Council has the powers to boost Africa's prosperity, It should use it

Kigali this week is something like an African diplomatic capital. Members of the African Union Peace and Security Council are in Kigali for week-long retreat to dissect and decide the continents future.

Kigali this week is something like an African diplomatic capital.

Members of the African Union Peace and Security Council are in Kigali for week-long retreat to dissect and decide the continents future.

 

African foreign ministers were also around to access how the current reforms in the AU are fairing under the guidance of President Kagame.

 

One does not need a fortune teller to know that even though some African countries are well on their way to a better and secure future, many others are suffering.

 

Some countries, even in the region, are beset by self-inflicted strife that could have been averted if the AU had done its job. But it suffers from an extreme bout of indecisiveness.

Things in many countries go out of hand because the continental body comes in too late, and even when it does, implementing decisions is an uphill task.

Members of the Council should leave Kigali with new resolve; that from now onwards, they will be doing things differently.

They should come out with new strategies of how member nations of the AU could invest in creating peaceful and secure countries, the requisite ingredients in developing a nation.

That is what this country learnt very early 23 three years ago; if it became necessary, it would reinvent the wheel to suit the country’s interests.

When the AU assigned President Kagame the daunting task of leading a team to reform the body, it was a vote of confidence, not only in the president, but also in the Rwandan recipe.

Learning to walk the talk and putting Africa’s interests first is the starting point. The Council has it in its powers to turn this continent into a haven of peace and prosperity.

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