Singer Buntu on why he chose gospel music

Gospel music singer Luc Buntu came to the limelight after the release of his 2013 single, Ntutinye. He uses talent as a singer and composer to influence others to give their lives to God.
Gospel musician Luc Buntu performs at a recent event in Kigali. / Courtesy
Gospel musician Luc Buntu performs at a recent event in Kigali. / Courtesy

Gospel music singer Luc Buntu came to the limelight after the release of his 2013 single, Ntutinye. He uses talent as a singer and composer to influence others to give their lives to God. 

The 32-year-old musician is well known for the following hits; Tukumenye, Uniongoze, Iyo ataba Uwiteka, Humura mutima, Duhimbaze, and Shimwa Mana, among others. He is a member of Africa New Life Ministries, (ANLM).

 

Buntu, who is also the coordinator and music director at Africa Let's Worship (Aflewo) Rwanda, talked to Donata Kiiza about his life as a gospel artiste.

 

Excerpts:

 

When did you start singing and why did you choose to do gospel music?

I started singing when I was still very young. I remember singing in the children choir at church. Despite growing up in a religious family, with my father being a pastor, I chose to do gospel music for many reason, one of which being the reference to music I got from the church.

How is your music different from other gospel artistes’?

I think what makes my music unique is because every song I have ever written is a reflection of what was going on deep within me at a certain point of my life. It could have been a prayer for help, a conversation with my own soul or a thanksgiving note to God.

Which famous gospel musicians inspire you, and why?

Many gospel musicians inspire me; classic hymns writers like Fanny Crosby, who composed great hymns like Blessed Assurance, to God be the Glory, Pass me not gentle Savior and contemporary worship artistes like Israel Houghton, Don Moen, Chris Tomlin and Darlen Zschech inspire me.

I admire them because of their personalities and talent. Their artistic work has inspired many and they have served as models. Locally, I’m inspired by Aimé Uwimana and Apollinaire Habonimana. These men are pillars in the worship music arena in Rwanda and Burundi.

Do you perform in public places? Describe those occasions?

Yes, actually quite a lot. I have a band that I formed in 2013 and together we host a monthly worship concert themed, “The Audience of One”, since January 2015. These worship concerts are held at Solace Ministries in Kacyiru on the last Friday of the month. I have also served as a worship pastor in different churches in Kigali, and currently, I am a music director at the National Thanksgiving Festival, locally known as Rwanda Shima Imana.

Last week, I performed at the Africa Let's Worship (AFLEWO), an annual interdenominational All-Night Worship project that was held in Nairobi, Kenya, and was attended by more than 20,000 people. I also perform at social gatherings with my band ONE33.

Do you think Rwandan gospel musicians can expand their reach?

Absolutely! The gospel music in Rwanda has a lot of potential for growth. But for this to take place artistes must understand that they need to develop their skills, polish their music and produce quality.

What are you working on?

I’ve just released my latest 15-track album Mfite Ubuhamya and contributed about 5 singles out of 14 songs to Singiza Music Ministries’ new album titled, Tukumenye.

I’m also working on two new studio albums, one in Kinyarwanda and another in Kiswahili to grow my influence in the region.

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