Kigali climate talks: India calls for ‘balanced agreement’

As delegates from around the world descend on Kigali for key talks geared at amending the 38-year old Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer, India has urged nations to use the negotiations to strike a deal that is good for everyone.

As delegates from around the world descend on Kigali for key talks geared at amending the 38-year old Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer, India has urged nations to use the negotiations to strike a deal that is good for everyone.

India says world leaders should seek balanced judgment and put all components into consideration while pushing for the amendments on the Montreal Protocol during the talks in the Rwandan capital this week.

 

“Even as India contributes constructively to the negotiations in Kigali, issues such as the uncertainty of future technologies and its costs, including the choice of next generation refrigerants, and additional funding required for transition in a sustainable and affordable manner, need to be addressed,” a statement released over the weekend by the Indian delegation to the Kigali climate talks reads in parts.

 

Rwanda, Morocco and U.S have all called on the world to agree on the amendment of the Montreal Protocol to phase down the production and consumption of hydroflourocarbons (HFCs).

 

HFCs have become popular substitutes for ozone-depleting substances.

But, even though the amendment move is seen as likely to be adopted by all the 198 signatories, India urged Parties to the Montreal Protocol to “enable the stabilisation” of the technological transition to sustainable implement the amendments, which would be made on the treaty during the 28th Meeting of Parties to the Montreal Protocol in the Rwandan capital.

India, one of the top 10 largest economies in the world, observes that, historically, developing countries have always received a grace period of 10-15 years after a particular refrigerant has phased out in developed countries.

This, it says, has enabled technologies for transition to be stabilised and made available at low cost, while resolving barriers related to patents.

“India is seeking a balanced agreement where all components like access to technology, finance and capacity building are consistent with the principles of Common but Differentiated Responsibilities and Respective Capabilities,” the statement adds.

India, however, reaffirmed its commitment to “working together’ with all nations towards management of HFCs, which shall mitigate climate change in a sustainable manner.

“We have come to Kigali with an open and constructive mindset, and look to work with all nations in a positive manner. We are willing to be flexible in order to reach a just and equitable HFC amendment that balances climate ambitions with the development and economic imperatives of our people.” the delegation said.

The delegation said India hoped the considerations in the agreement are for the “good of all”.

Production and consumption of HFCs in India continues to be at 2.32 per cent and 1.89 per cent of world production and consumption.

Recognising the environmental challenges associated with increasing HFC use, India is said to have taken measures in moving towards lower- global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants in the room AC sector.

The phase out of ozone depleting HCFC-22 is being accompanied by leapfrogging conventional R-410a and adoption of lower GWP refrigerant gases such as R-32 and R-290.

With increasing adoption of R-32/R-290 over R-410a, India is already on a low-Green House Gas pathway, the statement said.

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