‘Korea Corner’ opens at Kigali Public Library

‘Korea Corner’ has been set up at Kigali Public Library in Kacyiru. It aims to increase access to Korean literature and culture for Rwandans.
L-R: Amb.Park Yong-min, Dr Ntivuguruzwa and Choi je yun, Deputy country director of KOICA during the launch of the Korea Corner at the Kigali Public Library in Kacyiru on Tuesday. ....
L-R: Amb.Park Yong-min, Dr Ntivuguruzwa and Choi je yun, Deputy country director of KOICA during the launch of the Korea Corner at the Kigali Public Library in Kacyiru on Tuesday. ....

‘Korea Corner’ has been set up at Kigali Public Library in Kacyiru. It aims to increase access to Korean literature and culture  for Rwandans.

A Memorandum of Understanding to that effect  was signed last April between the South Korean embassy in Kigali and the Ministry of Education.

 

The Korea Corner, that was officially opened on Tuesday, currently has about 170 books, 60 non-print resources ‘Audio-Visual Materials (DVD and CD), personal computers and  Korean traditional crafts.

 

Speaking at the launch, Park Yong-min, the Korean Ambassador to Rwanda, said the corner will serve a valuable relationship that is growing strongly and rapidly between the two countries.

 

“Though Korea is geographically far away from Rwanda, the psychological distance between people can be shortened. Through our Facebook pages, we are introducing information about Rwanda and its culture to the Korean audience. This will help bridge the distance between the two countries,” he said.

The Korean embassy recently opened an art exhibition by a Korean painter, a civil festival of Korean movies, a competition about Korean speech contests, and will,  every first Friday of each  month, show movies.

“We will continue to increase cultural engagement,” Yong-min added.

Dr Celestin Ntivuguruzwa, the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, noted that Rwanda was ready to maintain existing cooperation with Korea and the two had developed different projects together.

“The purpose of having the ‘Korea Corner’ here is to expose our children and youth to Korean literature. This can enable cultural exchange, and the learning of Korean language for those interested,” Ntivuguruzwa said.

The corner is expected to increase the number of books and digital materials, according to the Korean envoy.

Ntivuguruzwa said the Ministry of Education is employing various efforts to increase literacy.

He encouraged the youth to always seek more knowledge in order to fit in the fast changing society.

“We hope that students who want to pursue further studies in Korea will learn abit of the Korean language from here, they can learn about the Korean  society and cultures.

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