Language proficiency is still a challenge in the labour market, says talent scout Rutagengwa

Fiona Kamikazi Rutagengwa is a talent advocate at AkilahNet who apart from that does social media marketing as a ‘side hustle’. Sunday Magazine’s Sharon Kantengwa had a chat with the 25 year old on her talent advocacy experience.
Fiona Kamikazi Rutagengwa. / Courtesy.
Fiona Kamikazi Rutagengwa. / Courtesy.

Fiona Kamikazi Rutagengwa is a talent advocate at AkilahNet who apart from that does social media marketing as a ‘side hustle’. Sunday Magazine’s Sharon Kantengwa had a chat with the 25 year old on her talent advocacy experience.

From modeling to banking and talent advocacy. You seem to be shifting your careers into the opposite direction, why is this so?

 

Modeling was just a passion, but I can’t call customer relations and talent advocacy “shifting to an opposite direction” because I consider myself a people person and these two job roles revolve around that on a daily basis.

 

What is your best and worst experience as a talent advocate?

 

My best experience was in June when I trained a member before an interview, as one of the services given to MindSky members. The employer liked her very much because she was prepared and she got the job. My worst experience was the first time I realized people ask family or friends to do their applications. When you meet them in person, you feel disappointed.

What has been the most interesting job that you have ever had?

I love being a talent advocate because I get to meet people with different backgrounds on a daily basis and help them build their careers and make big steps towards their dreams.

What do you find interesting about your current job?

The relationship I have managed to build with members at MindSky because we use a personal approach that helps our members feel comfortable with their talent advocates and the whole company.

What would you wish to change in the labor market?

I think the biggest challenge we have in the labor market is a skills shortage, particularly language proficiency, and a mismatch between people’s qualifications and the jobs they hold. This mismatch starts at the education level and grows until it starts affecting the labor market.

Being a social media enthusiast, how does social media help you with your work? 

It does help me a lot because I use social media to inform my followers about the importance of becoming a MindSky member. We save you the burden of dropping your CV door-to-door. Everyone knows a job search is tough, but we make it easier by doing the hard work for you.  

What do you find overwhelming about talent advocacy?

The most challenging part is figuring out if what people tell you is really true. MindSky is an online platform, so people apply through our website. But sometimes the person who wrote the application is the not the same person who shows up for the interview. We might receive a well-written application, but then the person who comes in can’t speak English. That’s why it’s critical for us to interview each member in person.

What is the most important qualification that employers look out for in candidates?

There are many and they depend on the employer, but I can tell you the most important is values. Every employer needs someone who can take initiative and be a problem solver. They also look for people who are collaborative, confident, and passionate and have conversational proficiency, generally in English.

What would you want job seekers and employers to know?

With technology job hunting is made easy. This is why we have websites like MindSky. We also help by saving hiring managers from those piles of CVs they receive every week by giving them a limited number of candidates that we have shortlisted based on the qualifications they are looking for.

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