Local music industry needs healing, says music enthusiast Hakizimana

Abdallah Hakizimana is a Jack of all trades. He is a graphic designer, photographer and showbiz personality. He is passionate about music and is currently working on ‘Healing the music industry’, a show that will soon be aired on Royal TV.
Hakizimana says artistes should change their attitude if  the music industry is going to succeed. (Courtesy photo)
Hakizimana says artistes should change their attitude if the music industry is going to succeed. (Courtesy photo)

Abdallah Hakizimana is a Jack of all trades.  He is a graphic designer, photographer and showbiz personality. He is passionate about music and is currently working on ‘Healing the music industry’, a show that will soon be aired on Royal TV. He spoke to Society Magazine’s Donata Kiiza about the challenges hindering the growth of the local music industry and the way forward.

What does ‘healing our music industry’ mean?

 

A lot about our music industry is really not going the way it should; this includes musicians, management and production. There is need to fix it.

 

What do you think is the root cause of this ‘mess’ you talk about?

 

 A lot is to blame, especially the musicians, they do not have a creative attitude or control over what they do for that matter.  For one to be a good musician he or she must have a full package and this involves great vocals, performance, and the ability to write their own songs.

As for the managers, I wonder why musicians cannot hold a concert and pull it off without issues. Take Jay Polly’s recent album launch which flopped miserably at Petit Stadium for example, so much was wrong with it, from the artiste to the management.

Are you saying some artistes are mediocre and are only ‘hitting’ because they have the money to produce music?  

It is one thing to have the money to survive in the music industry, and it is another to have talent and make actual good music. Talent is paramount. Yes, you also need money, but the assumption that you only need money to make it in the industry is wrong, hence, not a solution.

Urban Boys won this year’s Primus Guma Guma Super Star competition. Do you think it was fair?

First of all, musicians should not work hard to win prizes, but awards. Awards will take them places, even international scenes. These competitions are here to help, but I think they benefit the sponsors more than the musicians.  Conflict among artistes has come up and some of them even opted to stay out of all together.

So what do you think can be done to change for the better?

Professionalism… It must be taken more serious by managers, producers and musicians. The media platforms must be utilised to lift the industry, artistes must sing like they actually care, and maybe add some vision to their videos, something that will appeal to the audience. They should also change their attitude. They must invest more in their career because just like any other business, there are risks involved.

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