Low supply push up food prices in Kigali

Foodstuff prices have gone up in most city markets in what traders attribute to low supply from major producing areas.

Foodstuff prices have gone up in most city markets in what traders attribute to low supply from major producing areas. 

A mini-survey by Business Times indicates that the price of Irish potatoes went up marginally to Rwf300 per kilogramme from Rwf250, while cassava flour goes Rwf600 a kilo from Rwf500. Ground nut paste now costs Rwf1,400 in Kimironko and Nyarugenge markets, from Rwf1,200 last week.

The price of carrots went up by Rwf100 to Rwf1,200 per kilogramme, and tomatoes go for Rwf6,000 a basin from Rwf5,500. A bag of charcoal is at Rwf8,500, an increase of Rwf500 from Rwf8,000 previously.
Margaret Mukandamage, a vendor in Nyarunge market, attributed the increase to low supplies brought about by

heavy floods and landslides that affected some parts of the country over the past two weeks.

Meanwhile, prices of other foodstuffs and commodities were unchanged, with a five-litre jerrycan of cooking vegetable oil is at Rwf6,200, while milk goes for between Rwf300 and Rwf500 in most trading centres in Kigali and its suburbs.

A bar of soap is at between Rwf450 and Rwf600, while bread (weighing 1kg) ranges from Rwf800 to Rwf2,000, depending on the brand, size and type or whether one shops from neighbourhood shops or supermarkets.

Beef costs between Rwf2,000 and Rwf2,500 per kilo, while that of fresh fish costs Rwf2,500. The price of cabbages is at between Rwf300 and Rwf500 in most city markets, depending on size, while avocados cost between Rwf100 and Rwf200.

The price of mangoes is at Rwf1,400 per kilo, passion fruits cost Rwf1,300 per kilo, and pineapples go for 1,200 per kilogramme.

business@newtimes.co.rw

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