Man arrested over using forged documents in Rwf1.4 billion tender

Police in Gatsibo District have arrested Eraste Niyigena, a local entrepreneur, for allegedly using forged documents to win two tenders worth Rwf1.4 billion.

Police in Gatsibo District have arrested Eraste Niyigena, a local entrepreneur, for allegedly using forged documents to win two tenders worth Rwf1.4 billion.

Niyigena is accused of forging proof of previous contracts he had successfully executed in order to win a tender to construct a health centre in Ngarama sector and Agakinjiro, artisanal small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) in Gatsibo Sector.

 

The two projects were supposed to kick off by July, last year, and should be in the completion phase presently. However, little has been done so far.

 

The District Police Commander, Eric Kabera, said: “After realising that there were many stalled projects in the district and several complaints related to procurement procedures, we launched investigations to find out what would be the problem; we investigated project by project and in the process of authenticating Niyigena’s bidding documents we discovered some forgeries.”

 

Some of the forged document Niyigenza used include one that he indicated that he had constructed a 12-kilometre road in Gakeke District at a tune of Rwf652 million.

“In verifying the documents, we reached out to Gakenke District and we were clearly informed that Niyigenza has never done any project in the district and that the documents he provided were forged. We arrested him as we continue with the investigations,” said Kabera.

The suspect had already pocketed Rwf150 million by the time of his arrest. He is currently held at Kabarore Police Station.

“Investigations are still going on to find out if there are other forgeries or accomplices,” Kabera added, warning entrepreneurs against violating tender and procurement procedures, saying several measures have been put in place to identify such people.

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