EDITORIAL: Memories of the Genocide should only make us stronger

Yesterday, Rwandans went back down a bitter memory lane as they remembered, for the 22nd time, the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi that claimed more than one million of their compatriots.

Yesterday, Rwandans went back down a bitter memory lane as they remembered, for the 22nd time, the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi that claimed more than one million of their compatriots.

The bad weather only contributed in dampening the mood further, but for some, it was also a reminder that in the rainy season of 1994, many were saved by the downpour.

 

Killers took a break to take shelter thereby giving a breather to the hunted and a chance to escape that day but with slim hopes for the next. Today, the young kids who were skipping from one hiding place to another are young adults who are actively participating in rebuilding their country.

 

They are the country’s hope for tomorrow as we struggle to build firm foundations based on patriotism, understanding between people and the sanctity of human life. But the biggest asset is building self confidence and the resilience to trudge ahead.

 

Many speakers who took part in commemorations in all four corners of the world recognized that unwavering will of a people who were brought to their knees but today stand firmly on their feet with only one thing in their minds; reunite and work hard for their common interests.

For someone who did not experience the Genocide, it would be difficult to comprehend what it takes to move on, with vivid memories of loved ones lying lifeless on the streets or in pit latrines, still fresh as if it was yesterday.

Those are people to be saluted; they should inspire the next generation not to be held back in the quest of building a stronger and prosperous nation.

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