Police reconcile 10 families in Kirehe

Rwanda National Police (RNP) has continued its initiative to reconcile troubled families in a bid to foster peace and security in communities.

Rwanda National Police (RNP) has continued its initiative to reconcile troubled families in a bid to foster peace and security in communities.

Last week, police counsellors reached out to 10 families in Gahara Sector, Kirehe District, reconciling spouses who had suffered domestic strife.

In the interactive sessions, the spouses opened up and shared their experiences, enabling police counsellors to provide them advice on how to reconcile and avoid gender-based-violence (GBV).

Joseph Uwimana, 58, and his wife, Beatha Kamuyumbu, 52, who benefited from this programme, noted that their relationship was almost destroyed because of differences over asset ownership.

“As a husband, I accept that I misused our property because I did not think that my wife and children were co-owners of this property. I also wasted the family money on alcohol rather than buying necessities, and when my wife complained, I assaulted her,” Uwimana confessed, as he held his wife’s hand.

“But today, I understand that what I did was wrong. I am going to ensure that I put my family first. I am surprised that Police takes such steps to reach out to the public and discuss with us on how to overcome family wrangles,” he added.

Another resident, Clementine Mbarubukeye, 43, also said she always fought with her husband and even their neighbours had failed to bridge their differences.

“Today, we are talking calmly and I am smiling with my husband for the first time in a long period. Our children were always scared because we fought so much; but I am glad that we discussed openly and found solutions to our problems,” she noted.

The district community liaison officer of Kirehe, AIP Gahigi Harelimana, noted that the police counsellors always make follow-ups on these families, to ensure that they put in practice what they pledged to do.

“The Police realised the need to help families overcome misunderstandings; whereby, police counsellors and mediators reach out to troubled families and help them to solve their differences amicably. We regularly call these families and visit them to ensure that they are still in the frame of reconciliation,” he said.

Harelimana also called on other families with wrangles to reconcile, or seek help before their issues escalate into crimes such as gender-based violence and child neglect.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

 

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