TVET schools need to prepare students for life after exams

Editor, RE: “Over 22, 900 TVET candidates sit examinations” (The New Times, September 24).
TVET should prepare students who cannot only pass a practical exam but who can segue into the career world confidently. (File)
TVET should prepare students who cannot only pass a practical exam but who can segue into the career world confidently. (File)

Editor,

RE: “Over 22, 900 TVET candidates sit examinations” (The New Times, September 24).

While I agree with the Minister of State in charge of TVET that the schools need to provide appropriate guidance for students’ projects, there is a bigger problem at hand.

With so much weight being put on the national exams it is disheartening to read the comments of Daniel Abimana regarding lack of effective workshops and the inability or lack of permission to choose a topic of his interest. Are we educating robots or people?

The wholeness of education tutelage needs to be sound, multi-dimensional and well presented so that our students are not only successful at the national exam level but throughout their schooling leading into the workforce. Perfection is not expected overnight but tangible effort should be consistent throughout schools.

At White Dove Girls School we have been in a transitional upswing for the second half of 2015. We seek to not only stand apart but exemplify what our signage states—“A Centre of Excellence”.”

We have our challenges but we are purposed and united in producing a WDA school that not only prepares our students well for the national exams but for life thereafter. We began preparation for the practical exams in April 2015.

Students must be taught and given the tools to do research effectively, organise their thoughts, choose a topic that relates to their combination of study, and enhance their public speaking skills...

Let’s prepare students who cannot only pass a practical exam but who can confidently segue into the career world as “whole” individuals. Hold the leaders of the schools accountable. Poor management leads to poor programming, half-hearted teaching and stifled students.

Trice Dorrall

 

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