Young genocide scholars seek to learn from Rwanda's history

Fourteen young people from across the world will for the next two weeks take part in a workshop aimed at giving them insights into Rwanda’s experience of the Genocide history, transitional justice and good governance.
The youths being shown around the Kigali Genocide Memorial. (Courtesy)
The youths being shown around the Kigali Genocide Memorial. (Courtesy)

Fourteen young people from across the world will for the next two weeks take part in a workshop aimed at giving them insights into Rwanda’s experience of the Genocide history, transitional justice and good governance.

The workshop, which started on Monday, was organised by ‘Never Again’ Rwanda, a peace building organisation that mainly targets the youth, which was founded in response to the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The scholars are drawn from USA, Canada, Kenya and Rwanda.

The genocide scholars will examine the causes of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, its effects and the recovery process thereafter.

The two-week seminar themed, “What can Rwanda teach the world?”, will be conducted through group discussions, debate and critical analysis, film screenings, memorial site visits, lectures from experts in genocide studies and field trips to different institutions.

The scholars noted that from the two-week experience they hoped to learn lessons from various aspects of Rwanda’s journey.

Julie Ikeda, a student at Weber State University in the United States, said she was specifically keen on the reconciliation efforts and process.

Leah Thanji, a Kenyan law student at Mount Kenya University Nairobi, said she hoped to pick lessons applicable to conflict situations in her home country.

“My greatest motivation to come here to study is because, in Kenya, we are facing some challenges that Rwanda faced before the Genocide, so I’m very eager to learn,” Thanji said.

The organisation hosts such sessions twice a year and this is the 11th session.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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