Garissa varsity attack: What went wrong?

Editor, Refer to the story, “Kenya officials suspended after Garissa attack” (The New Times, April 22). For a country that’s at war, Kenya is so thinly garrisoned in areas of the border near conflict-torn Somalia that it needs to call on security forces from as far away as Nairobi to respond to security emergencies in Garissa; that should have been predictable.

Editor,

Refer to the story, “Kenya officials suspended after Garissa attack” (The New Times, April 22).

For a country that’s at war, Kenya is so thinly garrisoned in areas of the border near conflict-torn Somalia that it needs to call on security forces from as far away as Nairobi to respond to security emergencies in Garissa; that should have been predictable.

Given the clear threat from Al-Shabab to retaliate against Kenya for the KDF’s involvement in the war against the former—itself motivated by increasing incursions into Kenya to terrorise Kenyans and foreign tourists or to kidnap the latter for ransom—why were such soft targets as the Garissa University left without sufficient security in the vicinity so that four—only four!—terrorists could have as much time as they had to murder at leisure?

I may not be a security expert, but this degree of careless laxity in the face of predictable security threats raises lots of questions.

MK

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