Walk to Remember: are youth doing it for fun?

Editor, The walk to Remember has become an occasion for WhatsApp group meet-and-greet. The ‘young’ don’t fully understand why they walk; they most certainly don’t show full appreciation of Genocide commemoration events.

Editor,

The walk to Remember has become an occasion for WhatsApp group meet-and-greet. The ‘young’ don’t fully understand why they walk; they most certainly don’t show full appreciation of Genocide commemoration events.

You only need to speak to a few or observe their conduct to see how little they care.

Francois Gatete

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I want to thank Mr. Gatete for bringing this problem to light. If we don’t do everything possible to record the Genocide against the Tutsi, it will be rewritten by others and it will be distorted.

It’s high time we put into action what President Kagame has continuously urged us to do; write our own history. We can do such by writing books, making movies and documentaries and use the available media channels to disseminate this.

It hurts to see some of those young people heading to the Walk to Remember just for fun. It means that history isn’t engrained on their soul, that they don’t care.

No one should blame them; we should blame ourselves.

We, the older generation, have the mandate to do something about this as soon as possible.
Jeff Gatabazi

Reactions to the story, “‘Walk to Remember’ and the fight against Genocide denial” (The New Times, April 15)

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