EDITORIAL: Teacher motivation: The private sector too can chip in

For years, a debate has been ongoing on the need to improve the living conditions of one of the most valuable professions - teaching.

For years, a debate has been ongoing on the need to improve the living conditions of one of the most valuable professions - teaching.

Teachers in Rwanda, like many other countries, lie low on the salary pecking order.

Some tend to moonlight in several schools and private tuition to make ends meet, but this hinders their performance.

Some schools have introduced unofficial levies that serve as bonuses to motivate teachers, but this means that some parents have to unexpectedly dig deeper into their pockets.

While programmes like Umwalimu Sacco, a savings scheme, have been introduced, not every teacher benefits from their services, and those who do, complain of the red tape and frustrating conditions attached.

The government cannot solve the issue of low pay in the teaching profession on its own. The private sector should consider chipping in. For example, if an education tax was introduced, businesses would offer a fraction of their profits for a noble cause.

Every upright citizen would like to see their children earn a decent education. But this comes as a cost.

With incentives, teachers would have better earnings and consequently improved performances that we all yearn for.

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