New MPs association to fight Genocide ideology and denial

Legislators have formed a parliamentary association to fight against genocide ideology and denial in the country and beyond. The association, whose membership will be voluntary, is aimed at finding possible mechanisms through which the lawmakers can join the battle against genocide denial, ideology and revisionism.
Parliamentarians in a voting exercise during a previous session. The legislators have formed an association to fight against Genocide denial and ideology. (File)
Parliamentarians in a voting exercise during a previous session. The legislators have formed an association to fight against Genocide denial and ideology. (File)

Legislators have formed a parliamentary association to fight against genocide ideology and denial in the country and beyond.

The association, whose membership will be voluntary, is aimed at finding possible mechanisms through which the lawmakers can join the battle against genocide denial, ideology and revisionism.

Defending the association before a plenary session, last week, MP Zeno Mutimura said it was vital because genocide ideology was rooted in past government policies.

“Genocide ideology was spread since 1959 until it culminated into the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, but some of the people who masterminded it are still trying to push for in reoccurrence,” he said.

Mutimura said there are incidents of Genocide denial and revisionism happening worldwide, which called for concerted efforts to check.

The ideology is being promoted, among others, by the FDLR militia group based in eastern DR Congo, which is mainly comprised of elements responsible for Genocide, the MPs said.

“Time has come for this Parliament to form an association to fight denial and revisionism,” Mutimura said.

The association will be advocating for unity and reconciliation, sensitising the public against genocide ideology and denial, as well as informing the international community about the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Other tasks to be done by the association include carrying out independent research on the Genocide, the current state of Genocide denial, ideology and revisionism as well as promoting ties with other parliaments with the aim of fighting genocide ideology, denial and revisionism.

Mutimura, who chairs the parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Cooperation and Security, added that such associations exist in several countries that experienced genocide.

“States that experienced genocide are proactive in fighting genocide ideology, hence making it necessary for Rwanda to have a similar advocacy in the legislative assembly,” he said.

The association was formed last week days to the 21st Genocide commemoration due on Tuesday.

Legislators told The New Times that forming the association was timely, basing on the current wave of genocide denial and divisionism.

“The association has come at the right time; we will ensure that nothing takes us back to the darkest days of our history. We need to come together and fight genocide ideology and denial, and this should not be only for legislators but a fight for every citizen,” François Byabarumwanzi , the chairperson of the standing Committee on Unity, Human Rights and fight against Genocide, said.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

ADVERTISEMENT

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment