Career: Let us keep an open mind

Editor, Reference is made to Ivan Ingabire’s article, “Should nature prevail in shaping our careers?” (The New Times, March 11).

Editor,

Reference is made to Ivan Ingabire’s article, “Should nature prevail in shaping our careers?” (The New Times, March 11).

That is a great article; believe me, there are many out here—including me—who could write the same story! I personally agree with the spirit of following the career, but then you are paid peanuts yet somewhere else pays good dime; what do you do then?

It’s a total confusion here, especially when you are sharp and you can multi-task. Clearly, you think your IT career is ending but I think the first career is yourself, who knows may be you are good at banking than fixing IT issues.

Give it a chance and find out what exactly you are, just do not forget your IT codes immediately because you need to memorise your clients’ portfolio.

It’s a great story to share though.

Francis

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It’s actually when we reach the work environment, after we get our first salary that we really start thinking about career. It’s true our education does not focus at all at career building thus pushing us to get higher marks instead of falling in love with subjects and their related career.

You won’t be surprised how motorcyclists are more happy than most of the “salary men” because they are living something that was a dream for them.

You’re wondering why we get poor services from some institutions? It’s because those who were supposed to serve us are there because they were only motivated by salary—they are not busy building a career; they just wake up and go to work hoping the day will end soon so they could go back home.

Someone might think they are lazy but it s not the case, it’s just what you’ve just cited above: they were educated to get high marks that would give them a chance to get a nice job, paying well and never been bothered by a thing called career.

Elie

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