The rise of Sauti band

Sauti band has become a household name. It’s always on the must have list for anyone planning an event. The sky is the limit for a band that is just 4 years old. David Tuyishime, the founder of the band talked to Stephen Kalimba about their plans for the future.
Sauti band performs at Petit Stade.
Sauti band performs at Petit Stade.

Sauti band has become a household name. It’s always on the must have list for anyone planning an event.  The sky is the limit for a band that is just 4 years old. David Tuyishime, the founder of the band talked to Stephen Kalimba about their plans for the future.

When did Sauti band start?

I started Sauti band in 2010. Before then, I used to play live music and would save money because I wanted to start my own band.  I had a few musician friends I wanted to recruit, such as Alpha Rwirangira. So I wanted a platform where they could train and improve their skills.

How did you prepare for the busy festive season events?

We didn’t have much time. We were approached on December 11, last year; the first concert was on Boxing Day. We had to practice for King James’ Christmas launch in Musanze and The Urban Boys concert on January 3. It was a busy period; we were practicing from 8 am to 10 pm, we gave every artist 2 hours. And we did it, they surely acknowledge it.

What do you think are your achievements?

We have worked with almost all top musicians in the country and they appreciate our work. We are at a good level in Rwanda. We are thinking of going international. We are even in talks with music companies.

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David Tuyishime.

What would you advise someone who wants to form a band?

First of all you have to be a musician, you need to have passion and you need to be patient. To handle a team of musicians is hard work. You need to be responsible. If you’re not a musician or have those qualities, try something else. Like any other business, it starts in the head. 

The Band is based in Kimironko; at the same premises that houses my other music-based ventures like the Future Records (studio) and Diamond Dreams (company). 

Sauti Band will be playing for Cecile and Byumvuhore in Rubavu on January 16 and, we are organising a memorial concert for the late Christophe Matata who passed away in Burundi, later on January 27.

What are your practice sessions like?

We train three days a week and four hours a week. But when we have big gigs, we can train seven days a week. There are days we take time off and watch our recorded performances to correct our mistakes and improve. We also watch international artistes like Enrique Iglesias and their bands, how they act on stage and we learn from them.

  What is your music background?

I started my music journey at the age of five. My father was a pianist. He was strict disciplinarian.  At home it was about school, playing piano and then sleeping. My father was a pastor, and he used to play piano at Eglise des Amis in Kicukiro. To this day I still play piano and I am still a Christian.

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